Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
Data is Loading...
Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
In honor of the recent Reebok toning shoe 25 million dollar false advertising settlement, I want to kick the week off with some other recent bro-science breakthroughs you may have not been aware of. The Free-Flexor Maybe this whole post today was a bad idea.  I thought the ShakeWeight for Men was the pinnacle of awkward infomercials that made me really uncomfortable to watch, but Free-Flexor has just taken it to a whole new level.  I love the “developed and tested by fitness professionals” line at the end of the infomercial.  That’s a little like endorsing a new law as “developed by politicians.”  Interesting that they managed to both introduce and prove the “theory” of Circular Strength Technology.  Generally such theories are put forth in research papers and studies.  But, it has an acronym, so it has to be true. The Frank Sepe Fitness Disc A classic from over on the HSN.  Beyond the usual nonsense, Frank makes sure to point out that the rotation comes from the midsection, rather than the legs.  So essentially the workout is repeatedly twisting your lower back into submission while gaining no mobility anywhere you might actually need it. Nemesis Tracy Anderson pitches the fitness version of a perfect game.  She’s like the Roy Halladay of made-up crap.  Pseudo-science, bad exercise demonstrations, a total disregard for basic anatomy.  NAILED IT.  I haven’t seen a celebrity trainer dominate like this since Tony Little broke out the Gazelle.  I almost want to order it just to find out how she handles “glute-centric” workouts. That’s it for the first installment of Fitness Gimmick Monday.   I feel like there’s enough out there to make this a weekly feature.

0

Katy Perry, Fat-Free Ice Cream, the New York Jets …. We are inundated with lots of things that are given far too much credit these days.  Fitness is no stranger to this phenomena.  Let’s face it, some exercises just suck; yet for whatever reason, they consistently seem to be glorified by everyone from TV personalities to commercial gym personal trainers everywhere.  Don’t get me wrong, there are no completely useless exercises; but there are many that are completely ineffective for the majority of the general fitness population.  Let’s check out a few and learn why they aren’t all they are cracked up to be. keep reading

0

***Editors note, there will be algebra-like mathematics involved in this post Talking about injuries is boring.  Talking about math is more boring.  Using math to talk about injuries has the potential to be an all-time boring blog post.  Luckily I readily accept the challenge to take two incredibly boring topics and create the most interesting, informative, and entertaining reading you will do all day.  I promise it will someday save you from nagging pain, discomfort, and exercise-induced injury.* *Promise not available in all states.  Some restrictions apply.  Limit one offer per household keep reading

0

This past Sunday I was hanging out with my girlfriend’s eight-year old niece.  Actually more specifically, she was thrashing me at Wii Sports, highlighted by a near mercy-rule defeat in Baseball made more embarrassing by the fact she was throwing pitches by twirling the controller by its safety strap. At one point while the game was paused for another conference at the mound and pitching change (“Good effort tiny non-specific ethnicity man with no legs or arms, you gave it your all today”), she turned and looked at the Wii Fit(not mine I swear!!!) next to the TV.  On top were two tiny weights which I believe are used for the Jillian Michaels, uhhhmmmm ,“Workout” game.  She picked them up as I held my breath in horror, fearing that they may work like the “The Mask” and become one with her body, condemning her to a life of tricep kickbacks, Aerobics classes, and an unquenchable thirst for Dannon Light n Fit fat-free Yogurts (Yes, I said thirst, I’m pretty sure it’s closer to Fanta in chemical composition than real yogurt). Finally, after a little arm waving, she turned to me with a confused look on her face.  Out of her mouth came these angelic words, “Aren’t these too light to do anything?” Eight years old, probably all of about 55 pounds, and yet, somehow she innately understood what millions do not.  I didn’t have to explain minimal essential strain, progressive resistance, Type II muscle fibers, or the SAID principle.  Unbelievably, she was now more qualified to be dispensing fitness advice than Traci Anderson or her legions of followers.  Maybe she could come down to the beach with me and give a class for the poor misguided souls I see power walking with cushioned 1 lb hand weights or even better, the crazy lady rollerblading with ankle weights strapped on (I take that back, it’d be a sin to stop someone when they’re out Bladin’, roll on sister, roll on) So what’s the takeaway from all this, other than the fact that it’s childish for me to be berating a Wii character for not diving for a forehand down the line?  Maybe we always knew how to move correctly and how to get stronger.  Maybe we concoct ridiculous exercise gimmicks, machines, and fitness trends not because deep down we think they work, but because we wish they did, or we want to prey on the fact that others wish they did.  After all, look at the exercises that work.  We didn’t just make up deadlifts or squats, they are all part of how we naturally develop and move.  So, next time you go to work out just ask yourself, what would an eight-year old do?

0

“One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity.” The Power of Elimination | Part One It is a very American attitude to want to solve problems and make ourselves feel better by adding more, doing more, and consuming more.  Fitness and health are certainly no stranger to this phenomena.  I’m constantly asked what more can be done to expedite or compound results.  What I’ve come to realize is that rarely is doing more the answer.  Quite frequently it’s the exact opposite; something needs to be removed in order to achieve progress.  Be it clients trying to lose weight, athletes, or even my own personal workouts, harnessing the power of less can create better results faster.  In this three part series I’m going to talk about utilizing this strategy for different situations. keep reading

0

I’m starting a new series today in the blog to provide a beacon in the rough seas of training in the “big box.” A world where logic and common sense need not apply.  A world where exercise physiology and functional anatomy have no place.  A land free of the constraints of sleeves and clothing that actually fits.  However, fear not, with a little guidance you can persevere and even thrive in this hostile battleground.  Perhaps you may even rescue another well-meaning but misinformed soul lost in the land of selectorized equipment and machines with seat belts. keep reading

0

If P90x can make up fake exercise science concepts, so can I.  Well, actually, muscle comprehension differs a little in that it’s actually rooted in fact, not Tony Horton’s grand marketing scheme.  Hunter and are about ten days into a workout system devised by my fitness man-crush Dan John and my favorite Russian who isn’t named Ivan Drago, Pavel Tsatsouline(for those not familiar with Pavel, he is pretty much solely responsible for bringing kettlebells to America, although he probably wouldn’t have had he known Jillian Michaels would use them to create a DVD of the most poorly executed exercise demonstrations since Sweatin to the Oldies).  The system is brilliant in its simplicity, and glorious in its convenience and effectiveness.  Here’s what it looks like: keep reading

0

I have a lot of friends that are pharmacists who are rightfully in high demand in such an, uhhhmmm, “experienced” region of the southeastern US.    They have a ton of knowledge about correct dosages, frequencies, and timing of medication.  From my limited perspective, I would imagine that the doctors prescribe just enough dosage to attain the desired effect of the drug and limit the side effects.  There would be very little advantage to taking above the prescribed amount for the majority of medications. So, what does this have to do with training and fitness?  We, as coaches, are a lot like doctors in a sense.  We write exercise prescriptions designed to attain the desired effect based on our assessment and the client’s goals.  With these prescriptions come dosages.  This is where the disconnect usually occurs.  If I “prescribe” three days a week of a one-hour full-body strength program, I didn’t intend for that to be supplemented with six hours of additional cardio and bicep curls.  If you doctor prescribes you 800mg of Tylenol after surgery, should you follow that up with a half bottle of Advil? (Don’t answer that).  Too much of anything is going to bring about some unwanted side effects.  Mixing medications can also cause serious interactions.  If your goal is to get stronger, that 500mg of Jogecia and 10cc’s of Zumbagra is probably counterproductive. In the same sense, often we have clients that NEED a lot of different “medications” in pretty big doses.  If your goal is to lose 50 lbs, your lower back is achy, and you can’t get in your SUV without a running start and catapult, telling you to walk on the treadmill one hour a week is probably about as effective as a sugar pill.  The bigger the issue, the more often and longer we need to correct it. Consistency is another huge part of both medicine and training.  If you are supposed to take something once every day, and you only take it once a week, it’s not going to work very well, no matter how great the medication.  I have had many clients struggle with this concept.  The best program and exercises in the world are useless if they aren’t done when and how they are supposed to be.  I don’t have a magic “pill” for a great body without hard work and focus.  But if you follow my prescription and do what it says on the label, I have the cure for what ails you. Brendan Hayden

0