Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
Data is Loading...
Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
Katy Perry, Fat-Free Ice Cream, the New York Jets …. We are inundated with lots of things that are given far too much credit these days.  Fitness is no stranger to this phenomena.  Let’s face it, some exercises just suck; yet for whatever reason, they consistently seem to be glorified by everyone from TV personalities to commercial gym personal trainers everywhere.  Don’t get me wrong, there are no completely useless exercises; but there are many that are completely ineffective for the majority of the general fitness population.  Let’s check out a few and learn why they aren’t all they are cracked up to be. keep reading

0

***Editors note, there will be algebra-like mathematics involved in this post Talking about injuries is boring.  Talking about math is more boring.  Using math to talk about injuries has the potential to be an all-time boring blog post.  Luckily I readily accept the challenge to take two incredibly boring topics and create the most interesting, informative, and entertaining reading you will do all day.  I promise it will someday save you from nagging pain, discomfort, and exercise-induced injury.* *Promise not available in all states.  Some restrictions apply.  Limit one offer per household keep reading

0

“One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity.” The Power of Elimination | Part Two It is a very American attitude to want to solve problems and make ourselves feel better by adding more, doing more, and consuming more.  Fitness and health are certainly no stranger to this phenomena.  I’m constantly asked what more can be done to expedite or compound results.  What I’ve come to realize is that rarely is doing more the answer.  Quite frequently it’s the exact opposite; something needs to be removed in order to achieve progress.  Be it clients trying to lose weight, athletes, or even my own personal workouts, harnessing the power of less can create better results faster.  In this three part series I’m going to talk about utilizing this strategy for different situations. Athletes are particularly prone to overcomplicating the training process, often through no fault of their own.  I’ve trained athletes who literally have 6 hour baseball practices in high school, complete with hundreds of crunches and pushups.  This represents a total lack of appreciation or understanding of specific strength development, movement quality, and central nervous system fatigue.  The reason that that military has and to some extent still uses this “calisthenic” type training has more to do with what’s possible to do with hundreds of soldiers, no equipment, and minimal supervision rather than what will actually make them better. There is a phrase used when discussing body composition, “underweight, over-fat,” referring to the idea that although someone weighs less than they probably should, they are carrying a higher bodyfat percentage than someone ideally would at that weight.  For athletes, I like the phrase “over-trained, under-developed” or more specifically “under-strengthened.”   We see athletes that are perpetually tired and sore from “training” but yet are incredibly weak and lack stability.  Usually this is the “more is better” approach taken too far by an overzealous coach or parent.  In their mind, running mile after mile or doing a million crunch variations will have some sort of positive transient effect on their on-field performance.  Wrong. “Strong” as it applies to most team sports refers to maximal or near maximal force production over a short period of time.  This type of strength is not developed as a result of just “feeling the burn” of lots of sets of high-rep crunches and curls, nor will distance running “strengthen” your legs despite what traditional training lore might tell you.  It’s not just about how big your muscles are, either.  Strong is the ability for your brain and body (neuromuscular) to create instantaneous expressions of force.  It doesn’t take a lot of reps, time, or always cause a ton of soreness. I think the best way athletes can utilize the power of elimination in their training is to cut out a lot of the “junk” in their training programs.  Focus on progressing and mastering basic compound strength exercises and stay exclusively below 8 reps.  Sixteen to twenty sets per workout total is more than sufficient to improve strength.  It may seem counterintuitive to not have to crawl out of the gym from exhaustion, but it’s simply impossible to train that way and get consistently stronger.  Noted Strength Coach Eric Cressey asks the question, “are you making your clients better or just making them tired?” Don’t be constantly looking for more exercises or drills to improve athletic performance.  What you end up with is a lot of subpar crap and little progress.  Excel at the basics, focus on getting stronger, and forget the rest. In Part Three of this series, I’ll discuss how I applied the elimination principle and increased my progress

0

“One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity.” The Power of Elimination | Part One It is a very American attitude to want to solve problems and make ourselves feel better by adding more, doing more, and consuming more.  Fitness and health are certainly no stranger to this phenomena.  I’m constantly asked what more can be done to expedite or compound results.  What I’ve come to realize is that rarely is doing more the answer.  Quite frequently it’s the exact opposite; something needs to be removed in order to achieve progress.  Be it clients trying to lose weight, athletes, or even my own personal workouts, harnessing the power of less can create better results faster.  In this three part series I’m going to talk about utilizing this strategy for different situations. keep reading

0

Having trouble getting the body you want?  Plagued by confusion, injuries, and a general lack of results?  Not achieving your performance goals or hitting your numbers?  I have the secret!  (Actually, I learned the secret from a guy named Dan John, who is like the anti-Tony Little)  Are you ready to find out what you are doing wrong?  Ready for the most profound piece of wisdom you will ever receive?  Here it goes.  keep reading

0

I usually reserve Friday’s for less heavy topics  but I don’t want to let this bug me all weekend so buckle up, we’re going deep today.  I’ve noticed lately that I’ve had to add a third topic to things not to discuss at cocktail parties.  See, it was always religion and politics which were on the off-limits list, now it seems its sacrilegious to speak against the almighty Yoga, or even worse, desecrate the temple of Crossfit.  Fitness enthusiasts and sadly even fitness professionals have built walls around their factions.  To even suggest that spinning may not solve world hunger is to some as personal an insult as to declare their spouse an unchaste floozy. keep reading

0

I have a lot of friends that are pharmacists who are rightfully in high demand in such an, uhhhmmm, “experienced” region of the southeastern US.    They have a ton of knowledge about correct dosages, frequencies, and timing of medication.  From my limited perspective, I would imagine that the doctors prescribe just enough dosage to attain the desired effect of the drug and limit the side effects.  There would be very little advantage to taking above the prescribed amount for the majority of medications. So, what does this have to do with training and fitness?  We, as coaches, are a lot like doctors in a sense.  We write exercise prescriptions designed to attain the desired effect based on our assessment and the client’s goals.  With these prescriptions come dosages.  This is where the disconnect usually occurs.  If I “prescribe” three days a week of a one-hour full-body strength program, I didn’t intend for that to be supplemented with six hours of additional cardio and bicep curls.  If you doctor prescribes you 800mg of Tylenol after surgery, should you follow that up with a half bottle of Advil? (Don’t answer that).  Too much of anything is going to bring about some unwanted side effects.  Mixing medications can also cause serious interactions.  If your goal is to get stronger, that 500mg of Jogecia and 10cc’s of Zumbagra is probably counterproductive. In the same sense, often we have clients that NEED a lot of different “medications” in pretty big doses.  If your goal is to lose 50 lbs, your lower back is achy, and you can’t get in your SUV without a running start and catapult, telling you to walk on the treadmill one hour a week is probably about as effective as a sugar pill.  The bigger the issue, the more often and longer we need to correct it. Consistency is another huge part of both medicine and training.  If you are supposed to take something once every day, and you only take it once a week, it’s not going to work very well, no matter how great the medication.  I have had many clients struggle with this concept.  The best program and exercises in the world are useless if they aren’t done when and how they are supposed to be.  I don’t have a magic “pill” for a great body without hard work and focus.  But if you follow my prescription and do what it says on the label, I have the cure for what ails you. Brendan Hayden

0

Fitness Frauds | Celebrity Trainers Blame the Brazilian Butt Lift guy for this entire rant.  He pushed me over the edge.  Apparently, the glute minimus is responsible for “lifting” the backsides of the world’s greatest models.  I’ll spare you the anatomy lesson, but that is total and utter nonsense.  It’s not even located in the same place as his wonderful 3D diagram places it.  And to my knowledge, there isn’t any special exercise to “isolate it” from its larger rear-end counterparts, glute maximus and medius.  The dvd is action-packed with his special moves to melt fat and totally renovate your rear-end, and apparently modify your DNA as well.  My biggest concern with exercise DVD’s in general, however, is the lack of feedback.  This is also an issue with take-home physical therapy programs.  The people demonstrating these exercises are professionals.  I would guess most at home are not.  What is happening on the screen and what is being done by the person watching often don’t even resemble the same movement.  Most exercises that “target” the glutes can be butchered very easily with undesireable assistance from the lower back.  If you sit on your butt all day, I’m guessing it’s not getting too much work, hence the purchase of the Brazilian Butt Lift in the first place.  We find it takes weeks if not months of coaching to “retrain” the movement patterns around the hip and get the glutes firing properly.  I’m sure any good physical therapist would agree with me, being that it’s a standard protocol in lower back rehab.  So while some of these moves may “work” the glutes of the models and trainers, most who would buy such a DVD probably aren’t quite at that level yet. This is my whole issue with “Celebrity” trainers in general.  They are taking credit for something they have little to nothing to do with, and trying to use that to sell the same gimmicks to the rest of the world.  Training a “celebrity” or even a professional athlete isn’t that hard.  Jennifer Aniston didn’t start off at 185 lbs with a bad knee and two young kids.  Former NFL great Herschel Walker flourished on a program of just pushups.  In my mind, they are “freaks.”  Outliers.  The “Elite.”  They aren’t relevant to any normal person who wants to lose weight or get in better shape.  My best friend in college got straight “A’s” and literally never cracked a book, nor missed a happy hour.  Is that the “secret” to getting a 4.0?  I gave it a shot for about half a semester and had to scramble to even stay eligible.  So why is Gwyneth Paltrow’s pink dumbbell arm program any different?  It’s like me saying I was Lebron Jame’s height coach.  Yep, when he started he was only 5’4.  Of course, he was 8 at the time. The point is these celebrities would get better results from a sound training program from a knowledgeable fitness professional.  That is, if those professionals weren’t too busy training actual clients to join their entourage.  However, they have the time, resources, and genetics to be successful with about any program, provided it’s not too ridiculous and unsafe.  The problem is, the rest of us don’t.  These trainers are just oversized personalities with little to no credentials, education, or real-world experience to support their “philosophies.”  “Methods are many, principles are few, methods may change, principles never do.”  I love this quote.  The principles of exercise are universal and more like scientific laws.  Every good coach and trainer in the world agrees on them.  Methods can be different as long as they still adhere to the principles.  When I hear nonsense like “bulky muscles,” “toning,” and “fat-burning zone,” we have a principle problem.  There is a definite right and wrong here.  Whereas if another coach prefers 5 sets of 5 and I prefer 4 sets of 6, that’s methodology and more like opinion. Most of the great coaches and trainers in the world you probably have never heard of.  They don’t go on Oprah, or have shows on Bravo or the E! Channel.  What they do have is education, knowledge, and the ability to generate results for REAL people.  Just because someone like Jillian Michaels or Tracy Anderson weasels their way on TV doesn’t mean they have any idea what they are talking about.  Hey, Richard Simmons was huge too!

0

Originally Published on www.haydenperformance.com

If you are like most of the population, you typically lift in “straight” sets; that is 2-4 sets of one exercise, then on to the next. An adventurous few may occasionally “superset” two exercises, typically with opposing muscle groups, although unfortunately this usually takes place on “arm” day and involves “bi’s and tris.” The purpose of this article is to present a much more efficient approach that can be utilized in any program effectively and save time while increasing performance.

0